Tag : 3D cell culture

Written on Aug, 26, 2020 by in , ,

“Fluidics” is the information extracted from bodily fluids and the understanding of liquids or fluids using small diameter volumes. Hippocrates (400 BC), Galen (200 AD) and Theophilus (700 AD) were interested in analyzing urine samples — to understand the human body and its functions (1). They compared and analyzed urine color, corresponding to patients’ symptoms. About 1000 years later, scientists worked on the behavior of fluids using glass containers with small volume and diameters.

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Written on Jun, 09, 2020 by in , ,

Spheroids have been used in cell culture for decades. In the 1980s, different types of human cancer cells –normally grown as monolayers or suspension cultures–were tested for their innate abilities to form and grow as spheroids in vitro (1). 16 out of 27 tested tumor cell lines successfully formed spheroids (1). In the tumor cells study, scientists also observed that all large spheroids had necrotic centers but their shapes varied. Another study used V79 hamster cells (V79 379A), a human small cell carcinoma of the lung (ME/MAR) and 2 xenographed human melanomas (HX117 and HX118) in spheroids cultures in the 1980s (2). In the study, the effects on spheroid growth due to radiation treatments were measured and evaluated (2).

Widely acknowledged is the unique ability of spheroids to mimic natural cell responses and interactions. Cells in 3D are more representative of their native conditions than the traditional 2D monolayer culturing conditions (e.g., cell-to-cell interactions, drug-induced responses, and cells-to-environment responses). Furthermore, the multicellular arrangement allows different cell types to interact with each other within each spheroid. Past studies examined growth rates, hypoxic conditions, and other survival conditions for the spheroids (1-2). Currently, many cell culture reagents and instruments are available to enable spheroid cultures, making the technique increasingly accessible, flexible and approachable for scientists in a variety of research fields. (Unlock your creative minds!)

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Written on Dec, 17, 2018 by in ,

The increasing complexity of novel therapies calls for disease models that take us closer than ever before to the in vivo situation, to maximize efficacy and safety evaluations of new experimental treatments. Significant improvements in our understanding of mammalian tissue development, homeostasis, and extracellular matrix biology, coupled with advances in human iPSCs (adult stem cells) and 3D culture have facilitated the generation of organoids and organ-on-a-chip technologies that serve as in vitro 3D models of healthy and diseased mammalian tissue. These technologies aim to become an integral part of research and drug discovery to provide novel insights into biological processes, mechanisms of disease, and responses to drug candidates and other treatments.

Tempo Bioscience attended the World Preclinical Congress Europe in Lisbon last month. This congress centers on preclinical research across a broad disease spectrum, and aims to illuminate the challenges and opportunities within early drug discovery and development. This years program covered topics spanning organ-on-a-chip, 3D cellular models, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC), and artificial intelligence and machine learning in drug discovery, to name a few. Of particular interest to Tempo Bioscience, the meeting highlighted progress as well as challenges with organs-on-chips, with the latter including scalability and adaption of the technology for applications in the biopharma industry. Here, we round up our top 3 symposium highlights within the organ-on-a-chip space.

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