Tag : Cell of the month

Written on May, 01, 2020 by in ,

Vascular endothelium is a thin monolayer of cells that constitute the lining of blood vessels and organs (1-3). A hallmark of many diseases (e.g., cancer, diabetes mellitus, viral infections, etc) is highlighted in the dysfunctional states of the vascular endothelium. Vascular endothelial cells line the entire circulatory system — heart, large blood vessels, and small capillaries (1). And the cells form the barrier between blood and organ tissues (3). 

Notable functions of the vascular endothelium:

1) Controls and regulates vascular relaxation and constriction;

2) Regulates homeostasis of solutes, fluid, macromolecules, hormones, platelets, and blood cells;

3) Directs “foreign materials” to inflammatory cell types;

4) Regulates blood fluidity;

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Written on Aug, 07, 2019 by in , ,

Cardiomyocytes are cardiac muscle cells. They are terminally differentiated and facilitate contractile forces (“beatings”) of the heart. Grown in vitro as a monolayer sheath, cardiomyocytes are connected by gap junction proteins that help synchronize contraction-relaxation cycles of the cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes may be used in various in vitro or in vivo studies; transplantation into normal or diseased systems; cardiac toxicology studies; or cardiovascular developmental studies. Cardiomyocytes have a high mitochondrial density, which allows them to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP) quickly, making them highly resistant to fatigue.

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Written on Mar, 22, 2019 by in , ,

Welcome back to our cell of the month series. This time we’re talking about CD34+ cells, a type of undifferentiated multipotent hematopoetic stem cell (HSC) with the potential to differentiate into almost any other blood cell type under specific conditions. As stem cells, CD34+ cells naturally have the capacity for self-renewal, allowing them to divide and replicate indefinitely, making them a highly valuable source of hematopoetic cells in research and clinical settings. However, the CD34+ cell population in blood is extremely small, and is estimated to represent less than 0.5% of all other blood cell types.

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